10 guidelines for improving meeting effectiveness

- Ro Crosbie is president of Tero International, a premier interpersonal skills and corporate training company.

Business-people-planningThe meeting leader has an awesome challenge. This person is responsible for setting the tone of the meeting, keeping the group focused on the meeting purpose, managing (often complex) group dynamics, ensuring everyone is able to contribute to the meeting and managing meeting logistics. 

Sound like a daunting task? Meeting leadership is. And few people are highly skilled at it.

10 Tips for Meeting Leaders

  1. Understand the meeting’s purpose and goals. Why are we together? Distribute an agenda to the group in advance. Provide appropriate information or materials. To prepare people for the meeting and make the best use of your time together, invite participants to come to the meeting having completed a pre-meeting assignment.
  1. Create a safe, nonthreatening environment where all participants feel safe and comfortable and want to engage. Discourage participants from sniping or zinging one another, even in fun. Model an accepting attitude by withholding judgment of ideas and others and by drawing out everyone’s perspectives and feelings.  Encourage contrasting ideas. 
  1. Recognize that while people have different personalities and may or may not actively participate in the discussion, they all want to be listened to, recognized and appreciated as unique individuals. Work toward participation from everyone without insisting on it. Think of various ways people can contribute besides just talking (maybe written responses). Invite the group to help you figure out ways to energize group discussions. Watch for and act on opportunities to tell others that they have done well.
  1. Listen carefully to the person speaking while monitoring nonverbal behavior of the group. Be alert to signs of discomfort from group members. Identify and manage concern or confusion by noting it (e.g., “I sense that this is an area of concern for us ...”). Watch the interactions to monitor and clarify, especially when controversial issues are being discussed. 
  1. Respect the group by starting meetings on time and finishing on time or early. Consider designating a timekeeper for the meeting if you anticipate time management challenges. Only extend discussion times when the group will strongly benefit from that decision.
  1. Seek to reach consensus on issues. Resist the temptation to save time by settling for majority opinion or compromise. Agreement is necessary for lasting and meaningful outcomes.
  1. Handle emotional issues with compassion. Conflict, frustration, anger and sadness all require a great deal of courage to share. Intervene when group members verbally attack one another or when a group member violates meeting protocol. 
  1. Recognize when you are too highly invested in the outcome and ask for someone else to fill the role of meeting leader.
  1. End each meeting with a summary or some type of tying-up activity to provide closure. Clarify roles regarding who will accomplish any follow-up actions agreed to in the meeting. 
  1. Get group feedback on the meeting. Is there anything the group would like to see changed? How are people feeling? What is working? Identify one thing you could do better to make your leadership in the next meeting more effective.

Do you have other meeting techniques that have worked for you that you would be willing to share? Please use the comments section of this blog to tell us about them.

For more professional development content:Rowena_Outside

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube

Website: www.tero.com

The cost of meetings

- Ro Crosbie is president of Tero International, a premier interpersonal skills and corporate training company.

“If you had to identify, in one word, the reason why the human race has not achieved, and never will achieve, its full potential, that word would be meetings.”

- From Sixteen Things that it Took Me 50 Years to Learn, by Dave Barry

Business-people-meetingWe’ve all been there – captive in a meeting that drags on seemingly forever and nothing is accomplished. What is the underlying cause of the meeting failure, and how can it be solved? 

Many meeting leaders are not equipped with the skills and knowledge to effectively facilitate a meeting. Similarly, many meeting participants contribute to the problem through their own ineffective meeting skills. 

According to the Wharton Center for Applied Research at the University of Pennsylvania, the average senior executive spends 23 hours each week in meetings. Sadly, senior and middle managers report that a mere 56 percent of meetings are productive and that a phone call or email could replace more than 25 percent of meetings. 

When the resources that are involved in meetings each day are considered alongside of the above statistics, the financial drain to organizations alone is devastating.

Nearly everyone in a professional environment finds themselves, at some time, asked to participate or present in meetings. As careers advance, increased meeting participation (and eventually, meeting leadership) inevitably follows. 

At all levels of organizations, individuals employ state-of-the-art process improvement methodologies to streamline activities and accomplish more with less.  Curiously, and somewhat ironically, these same individuals who strive for maximum productivity in their work activities wrestle with frustration and setbacks caused by unproductive meetings.

Why are meetings unproductive?

  1. Lack of Progress: They are not strategically valuable. There is limited or no progress against a goal.
  1. Lack of Performance: They fail to bring out the best in the people who attend or those who are affected. Relationships are damaged or interpersonal friction is created.

Since meetings are a part of most corporate cultures and are simply viewed as part of business, many people don’t consider the cost of meetings. Interestingly, many people don’t even consider meetings to be part of work. Some people will end a meeting by saying, “Let’s get back to work,” implying that the meeting time was not work. Even less frequently is consideration given to the large advantage available to organizations that use meeting time wisely. 

Meeting leadership skills are some of the easiest changes to make in an organization. However, like most change, an investment of time in building new skills, challenging old habits and implementing new processes requires effort. 

In the next blog, we will focus on several strategies to improve the effectiveness of meetings.

For more professional development content:Rowena_Outside

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube

Website: www.tero.com

Leadership & legacy lessons

- Dr. Christi Hegstad is a Certified Executive & Leadership Coach, author, trainer and book addict. Learn more at MAP Professional Development Inc.

IMG_4729You will not find "When Breath Becomes Air" in the leadership section of your bookstore. But when I finished reading it -- after feeling uplifted while also wiping away tears -- I couldn't help but think of the leadership lessons inherent in this powerful book.

Paul Kalanithi, a neurosurgeon in his mid-30s, wrote this memoir after receiving a terminal diagnosis. Essentially, it's his story of finding meaning, purpose and joy every day, even amid the great difficulties he faced throughout his journey. It's inspiring, heartbreaking, uplifting and thoroughly thought-provoking.

While I won't attempt to summarize this book in a few words, I will share some reminders to draw upon in your leadership:

1. Let compassion prevail.

Regardless of appearance, everyone is fighting a battle or dealing with challenges we know nothing about. That includes your team members, your children, your leaders, the angry customer calling to complain. Continually turn to your kinder, higher self.

2. Clarify your values.

Whenever he'd ask "should I ..." questions, Kalanithi's physician would steer him back to his values. What matters most? How can you best honor that today? This week? Going forward?

3. Reconsider the perfect time.

Don't wait until everything is perfect to pursue a dream, strive for a goal, make a difference. Your work can bring great meaning to your life, and vice versa. What if now is the perfect time?

4. Surround yourself with greatness.

Consciously spend your time with people who challenge you to be your best. Kalanithi's wife, physicians, various co-workers and other connections served as heroes in his story.

5. Live each day to the fullest.

This is so much more than a cliche. Every day is a gift and an opportunity to make a difference in the lives of others. Don't let obstacles prevent you from creating meaningful experiences whenever and wherever you are.

Christi Hegstad MAP Inc HeadshotCOACH CHRISTI'S CHALLENGE:

One of my favorite topics to coach around is what I call your Leadership Legacy. Give this concept some thought this week.

Legacy isn't something to think about only when faced with our own mortality. You essentially choose your legacy by how you live, work, and lead every single day. If you don't have a grasp yet on your "big picture" legacy, consider it in smaller doses:

What would you love for people to say about you when you leave your next meeting?

How would you like someone to describe you to a stranger?

When people think of you, what word would do you want to come to mind for them? How will you live out that word today?

As a leader, you have the profound privilege and responsibility to make a difference in the lives of others through your example, words and actions; something to take seriously while living lightheartedly. Decide, right now, your Leadership Legacy. Then let your days be a beautiful expression of those with every action and interaction.

Dr. Christi Hegstad is a certified and award-winning coach helping people work, live, and lead with meaning and purpose. Learn more at www.meaning-and-purpose.com or on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi (Random House, 2016).

 

This site is intended for informational and conversational purposes, not to provide specific legal, investment, or tax advice.  Articles and opinions posted here are those of the author(s). Links to and from other sites are for informational purposes and are not an endorsement by this site’s sponsor.