« Are you hiring? | Main | Networking July 7 - Aug. 5 »

Need a little help with your bounce?

I recently volunteered during a summer festival my church was hosting.  It included all things BBQ and inflatable!

On that hot July evening, I found myself at the base of one of those Velcro walls. 

Yup.  The kind of amusements where kids and adults zip into a jumpsuit made of VelcroVelcro_wall, climb up on to a big pillow of air, jump a few times and then try to STICK themselves as high as they can to a equally Velcroed wall. 

It's a lot of fun.  But I have to admit that for most folks... the pillow of air and the jump didn't always work well together.  So most participants looked more like Chevy Chase than Shawn Johnson as they tried to touch the sky!

The problem was that I was the volunteer up next to the wall.  So, I stood on that same pillow of air... trying to remain upright... helping the kids go in the right direction and attach themselves to the wall.

It took me a little while to figure out my "system," but as the evening progressed I developed a way to help the kids get as high as they could.  (I'll admit that I passed on helping the heavy-set middle-aged man that stepped up and looked at me with expectant eyes!) 

As they'd step up to the wall, I'd have the kids practice jumping a couple of times.  That would let them get a feel for their own "bounce."  Then, I'd tell them on their third bounce that'd I'd give 'em a boost if they wanted it.

99.9995% of the kids accepted my offer.

So, first, I'd ask, "How high do you want to go?"

Some kids would look at me with eyes of caution and some with the eyes of Evil Knievel!

Then, once we got clear on "middle-high," "high-high" or "over-the-top," then I'd explain the next step in the process.

I'd say, "We're going to bounce three times and on the third bounce I'm going to give you a boost.  But I still need you to jump as high and as hard as you can.  I'll just help you up the wall."

Once we made our adventurous pact, I'd grab the back of their Velcro suit.  We'd bounce three times.  Then they'd jump with all their might and I'd toss with all mine. 

And they would wind up either "middle-high" or "high-high" depending on their request.  (NO, we didn't have any make it over the top, although my own 8-year-old came dangerously close!)

It was fun. 

The kids would "stick." They'd laugh or look around in wide-eyed-amazement.  Some of the parents even offered me bribes to "keep their kids on the wall" for extra five minutes! 

Yup.  It was fun. 

After the night was over, I thought about the experience some more.  I realized that the Velcro wall is a picture for life.  Isn't it?

I mean.  We all can practice our "jump."  You know... walk out our daily lives.  Try new things, learn new things, work, et cetera.

Some days looking like Chevy and some days looking like Shawn.

But when it comes down to it, in order to get to any kind of "middle-high" or "high-high" goals, we need help.  Don't we?

We need to jump as hard as we can, but it helps exponentially to have someone there to give us a "boost" and help us up the "wall."  So we "stick." 

Then, we'll be able to see things we never thought possible.

So, here's my "Velcro wall challenge" to you today... and really give it some thought.

Who could you give a "boost" to today? 

Who could you ask about their goals (either at home or at work)? 

Is it a co-worker?  A friend?  A neighbor?  Your significant other?

Ask 'em about what they want to do.  Where they want to go.  How high they want to jump.

Then ask 'em how you might be able to give 'em a boost. 

Maybe it's through some connections.  Maybe it's through giving some time on a Saturday afternoon.  Maybe it's just calling with some encouragement for that goal once a week.

Try it. 

Not with everyone, but with whomever comes to mind.  And then see what happens.

Maybe you even want to take it a step further and create a Mastermind Group of like-minded people... to take this challenge together.

And just watch... as you give some help... when you offer a little "boost" to someone else... just see what that does for you.

It might take some effort.  It might take some time.  But... as you see your friend... your co-worker... your spouse...  "stick" to heights they didn't think were possible... I'm betting it will feel great!

And don't be surprised to feel someone else grab the back of your own "Velcro suit" in the process and start to count down... 3... 2... 1... JUMP!

Take the challenge.  Keep dreaming BIG.  Let me know how it goes!

Mitch M

Photo credit and kudos: Mandy-Gill

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83452ceb069e200e553e96ff98834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Need a little help with your bounce?:

Comments

Mitch,

Excellent story -- thanks for sharing it. You know, when you think about it -- we are faced with bounce moments all day long.

Sometimes a stranger needs a mini bounce (a smile, a thank you, even just looking them in the eyes), or a peer might need a bit of a bounce -- five minutes to review something or listen to them share their weekend stories. And God knows, we are surrounded by people who are aching for a big old bounce.

What an opportunity for us to feel good about doing good.

Thanks for the reminder!

Drew

Mitch, I second Drew's comment, Great story! It is a constant reminder to, not only live for your goals, but also keep reminding those close to you about theirs.

Thanks guys!

I appreciate the feedback and the agreement!

I know that I've needed help with my BIG and small bounces, time after time.

Thanks for the boost!

Mitch

The comments to this entry are closed.

« Are you hiring? | Main | Networking July 7 - Aug. 5 »

Technorati Bookmark: Need a little help with your bounce?

This site is intended for informational and conversational purposes, not to provide specific legal, investment, or tax advice.  Articles and opinions posted here are those of the author(s). Links to and from other sites are for informational purposes and are not an endorsement by this site’s sponsor.