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Not your ordinary senior apartments

Merritt apartment 3Rob Smith is a principal at Architects Smith Metzger

Each year the Committee on the Environment (COTE) of the American Institute of Architects selects a Top Ten  “green buildings”. This and future blogs will review some of the projects to see what is cutting edge in green design.

Merritt Crossing Senior Apartments in Oakland, Calif., is not your ordinary senior housing. The building provides 70 apartments for seniors in the 30%-50% of the local median income and about half are for people previously homeless.  Yet the design is spectacular and not what one would expect for low income housing.

Merritt apartments 2Natural ventilation is important to seniors so the long and narrow building allows 85% of the spaces to be within 15 feet of an operable window. The floor-to-ceiling windows also let in plenty of natural light compared to the dinky windows many apartments get.

Green space is very important to seniors but with on-site parking requirements little exterior space remained. Lifts were provided in the lower level garage so cars could be stacked making way for a landscaped garden area.

A central high-efficiency hot water system is augmented with a roof top solar system which meets 70% of the hot water needs, something we don’t see often in Iowa. 

An array of solar panels also provides about 40% of the electrical energy for common areas such as lobbies, halls, and a community room.

All of this fits in with Des Moines Age Friendly City Initiative: attractive housing for seniors located near shopping and entertainment options.

Stay tuned for a school renovation and expansion project.

Send your thoughts to rsmith@smithmetzer.com

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Comments

Green, age-friendly, and "low income" are all great ideas, especially when combined into one project. My questions are: How many mature-adult, low-income individuals are on the design team? Is feedback from the targeted demographic ever actually incorporated into the final design?

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