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Building referrals begins with developing the right state-of-mind

Carl Maerz is a co-founder of Rocket Referrals, a startup company focused on helping businesses gain referrals from customers.


Referralmindset (1)Just do it. Who can forget Nike’s wildly popular ad campaign created in the late 1980s? Such a simple, yet compelling statement. But in order to ‘do’ there needs to be knowhow - a starting point, a calculated plan. This is especially true in regard to building your business through referrals. At Rocket Referrals I speak with businesses daily that have made the decision to get serious about a referral strategy - but to many, it is just a black hole. Therefore, I felt it appropriate to share a very simple concept that is essentially the starting point to any strategy to gaining more referrals. It begins with a mindset for you - the business - and that of your customers.

The Approach

Finding the right approach to gaining referrals as a business means understanding why it is that your customers refer you to their friends and family. I get it; businesses want more referrals for several reasons - to help others, and to drop more coins in their piggy bank. But customers really do not care about adding mass to your bottom line. They do care, however, about improving the lives of their loved ones. Therefore, as a business, it is paramount that communication with customers regarding referrals focuses on the reason why they refer. In other words, don’t make it sound like they are doing you a favor - rather that you want to do them a favor by providing awe-inspiring service. This is the referral mindset for you, the business.

The Tactics

A quick tip on how to put a positive spin on the language: make your customers feel like they are part of a growing community or family. Keeping it personal and exclusive will ignite their emotional spark plugs and motivate them to actively refer you. An example would be to send a welcome card with a message including “would love to grow our family” and “extend our hand to your friends and family, we will take extra care”.

The next step is to actively develop a referral mindset in the heads of your customers - right from the get go. Using language that conveys the significance of referrals for your business, subtly, yet consistently, will ensure that you are referred when the time is right. In this approach it is very important to do so by only playing on the emotional reasons why people refer (to help others) that I highlighted above. There are a several ways you can engage your customers that will be effective - and it starts right after they sign up.

Send a welcome email with a couple sentences explaining how your business values referrals and that they are important in growth. Emphasize that this growth is important because you love to extend your service to their trusted ones, to extend your family. This will convey the message that you are referred often and therefore must be doing something right. Follow it up by saying you trust they will find reason to refer you in the near future, because you care that much about what they think of you.

Find a reason to follow up with your customers as often as possible. Each time, give them thanks and let them know you are here to help with anything they need. Remind them that you are interested in extending your service to their loved ones. Over time, referring you will become second nature to your best clients.

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