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Practice makes perfect

Rowena (Ro) Crosbie is the president of Tero International Inc.

“We’ve never spent so much time and money to be so bad at anything.”

Golf_leadershipblog

That’s the phrase my husband uses to describe our collective attempt to master the game of golf.

He is referring to hours at the driving range, more hours on the course and years of membership at a private golf club. We were convinced that if we simply practiced enough, our game would improve. I should point out that by mastery we didn’t have any illusions of playing on the pro circuit. For us, simply not embarrassing ourselves on the golf course qualified as mastery.

Countless hours of practice and payments every month to the Club and our game never sufficiently improved.

What was missing? Did it require even more time on the golf course? This was already a time-consuming activity and we couldn’t imagine devoting even more time to it.

Maestro, mentor and polio survivor Itzhak Perlman had the following wisdom to share on the subject of practice. 

“As a child, I hated to practice.  But practicing is an art; it’s not just about putting in the time.  A lot of kids are too young to immediately get that.  They say, well, I’m going to do my four or five hours a day, and I’m going to keep repeating everything and it’s going to be good.  And sometimes they wonder why it’s not working. You need to organize practice; you need a goal. You need to ask yourself, 'Why am I practicing and what is it for?'  Sometimes the repetition without thinking can be counterproductive. If you practice something wrong – without knowing it – then you have to undo it by practicing even more.  If you practice slowly and with a brain, you will save a lot of time. You can accomplish in an hour what could take a week.”

Does practice make perfect? It is more accurate to say that practice makes permanent. 

This is an insight embraced by the greatest leaders. They acquire skills, set specific goals and practice those. That, not mindlessly repeating the way you’ve always done it, is the intelligent approach to mastery. They help those entrusted to their care to do the same.

How did the golf saga progress? Training helped. Videotaping helped. Small shifts in grip, swing and line of sight all contributed to improving the game. Now we know what to practice.

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