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Take the time it takes

Rowena (Ro) Crosbie is the president of Tero International Inc.

As many of you know, I live on a farm with 28 cats, a dog, 3 horses and a mule (and husband, Ted).    

Interacting with cats is a strength for me.  I have even, on occasion, mastered that unmasterable skill of herding cats (Monster.com may have a job posting for that). Horses

Horses are another matter.  Interacting effectively with horses has never been a strength of mine.  So I went to school.  My horse trainer politely explained as I wrestled with the complex skills, “If you take the time it takes, it takes less time”.

Those words are certainly unpopular in our fast-paced world of multitasking, instant solutions, and Mc-everything.  Nevertheless, some things take time.  Sometimes we need our leaders to remind us of this reality and sometimes leaders need to pause and remind themselves of the same thing.

The popular business press advocates the importance of maximizing strengths of people and that, for the most part, overcoming weaknesses is a waste of precious time.  That it takes far more time and energy to move from incompetence to mediocrity than to move from competence to excellence.

Sadly, many people, especially those with great strengths in specific areas, adapt this insight into an excuse for not knowing anything (or knowing very little) about other areas.  This is intellectual arrogance and is quite different than having no strength.

Consider highly technically-skilled individuals like engineers, accountants, scientists and technicians who report “I am not a people person” and defiantly oppose any situation that requires them to work effectively with people unlike themselves.  Similarly are the professionals in areas like marketing, sales, and human resources who pride themselves on their ignorance of basic process methodology or elementary accounting.

Although our goal should always be to build on our strengths, almost everyone can acquire enough of any skill or knowledge not to be completely incompetent about it.

No one can escape the fact—defects and weaknesses matter.  Success depends not only on moving steadily forward but on preventing derailment.  Preventing derailment means going beyond nourishing strengths and attending to flaws.

I invested the time it took (sometimes painstakingly) to learn to interact effectively with the horses.  Although I’m not off to any equestrian competitions, I now enjoy my horse interactions.

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