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Want a company that respects community involvement? Ask. Just ask.

Bizrec1- Cory W. Sharp is an intern architect at FEH Design in Des Moines and the current president of the Young Professionals Connection

This is the second of three posts on the value of community engagement. In the first post, Sharp lets his friend Kim Hanken write about the value of being involved in your community. Today, Sharp gives advice to millennials on how to find companies that share their community interests. Tomorrow, he writes about the benefits for companies to have a culture of community engagement. 

 

It's the question on a lot of millennials' minds: How do I find the right company that encourages community involvement or convince my current boss that it's worthwhile for our company to let me be more involved?

Don't take my word for it. There's plenty of research to back that up. I don't have room here to share all the details with you but the 2014 Millennial Impact Report, sponsored by the Case Foundation, is a good read on this topic for employees and employees.

But here's the key part: Millennials' preferences in the workplace include "how they engage with their company and what they look for in corporate cause work, with 'cause work' meaning the programs and initiatives companies execute that help people and communities Companies increasingly approach employee culture and corporate responsibility as important assets that inspire retention, productivity and a variety of other organizational benefits. As companies and nonprofits work together more, and more employers include cause work in their values, research is needed to understand the next generation of employees, their attitudes and their preferences for company cause work."

Sounds great. But even if companies are more focused on creating the right culture to attract and retain millennials, how do you find the company that will respect and value the causes you believe in and support?

Ask. Yep, it's that simple. Ask.

Whether it's in a job interview, meeting a company employee at a reception or party, or even picking up the phone and calling the company with specific questions, ask:

  • What's the company policy on volunteering? Is it a new or longstanding policy, and is it likely to change anytime soon?
  • What has the company's experience been with employees who have been involved in the community?
  • What causes does the company support -- or not?
  • How much company time is an employee allowed to devote to cause-related activities? Is it all paid or just time off?
  • Does the company match charitable contributions? If so, which organizations are eligible?

If you work at a company that currently isn't big on community involvement, the case for letting you do it is very persuasive. It starts with "building the business reputation, business recognition, networking opportunities and opportunities to improve the community, according to a 2012 Dun & Bradstreet story, "Community Involvement Helps Generate Capital."

FEH Design, the architectural firm where I'm an associate, has really supported me being involved in areas that have fired my enthusiasm and allowed me to build a network of productive relationships, including the Young Professionals Connection, the DART 2035 Advisory Committee and the Greater Des Moines Partnership's Transit Future Work Group.

In return, my employer has realized benefits, including organizations that want to work with FEH Design because of its commitment to community involvement and emerging leaders. It may seem like a tiny difference to some, but small things can make a big difference in a competitive marketplace.

That's enough ammunition for now.

Tomorrow: I'll cover that topic in detail -- and then you'll have plenty of great arguments ready to make your case.

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