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How to find the perfect coach - Part 2

RitaPerea_17-web-2- Rita Perea is president and CEO of Rita Perea Leadership Coaching and Consulting, specializing in working with senior leaders to successfully engage employees, lead teams, manage change and balance work and life.

You are ready to move forward, stretch yourself, and invest in performing at the “top of your game” in business. You want to achieve, reach your potential and self-actualize as a leader. You know that you can inspire others to be all that they can be. And you are ready to hire a one-on-one professional coach to help you reach your goals. Now what? What is your next step?

In part one of this series I shared that coaching is an unregulated industry and that, because it is an investment of time and money, researching a coach’s background is a crucial step. It is important to be thoughtful in identifying both your needs and the specialization your potential coach brings to the table to help you reach your goals. Just as you would not see a family practice physician to fill a cavity in your tooth, you would not hire a business coach to help you sort out your personal relationship problems.  

If we are serious about hiring an outstanding coach, our next step in this process is to educate ourselves about the most important qualities that an exceptional and professional coach will possess. In contrast, we can also identify the indicators that a coach is not so great. Take this checklist with you when you interview your potential coach to determine if they possess these attributes.  

The Top 9 Qualities to Look for in an Exceptional Coach:

  1. A good questioner. Does this coach ask relevant, probing questions to move you forward? Great coaches will ask questions that may not be easy to answer but that will cause you to think about your behavior and the changes you want. Professionally trained coaches use specific questioning techniques to help you express your thoughts and feelings. Coaches who lack a solid technique will skip over the deep questioning to only tell you what you want to hear.
  1. An active listener. Good coaches have been professionally trained to use six levels of active listening and body language -- such as nodding their head, making eye contact, taking notes -- which helps you know that they are fully present and engaged in what they are hearing you say. On the contrary, not-so-good coaches engage in “autobiographical listening,” which turns your coaching session into a litany of stories that are all about them and their experiences, not all about you, as it should be. Not-so-good coaches appear distracted, unorganized and distant. Not-so-good coaches do not accurately remember the details of what you have shared with them.
  1. Highly intuitive. Coaches who provide wonderful experiences for their clients use their intuition as an inner compass to map the way. Astute coaches guide their clients and facilitate their growth in both the personal and professional arenas by always looking forward to identify and navigate through potential obstacles. Not-so-great coaches may tend to use the “one size fits all" approach, rationalizing that if the process worked for one person, it can be put it on auto-pilot and used with everyone.
  1. Organizationally adept. Excellent coaches are organized coaches. They show you, by their actions, that they have strong planning and goal-setting skills. They are all about helping you achieve the results that you are seeking. They model and help you learn the planning skills you need to reach your goals. Contrast a thorough and organized coach with one who breezes into a meeting late with papers flailing about from their notebook. Which one would you want to put your time and money into?
  1. Results-oriented mindset. How does your coach measure your progress toward your goals? Does your coach use surveys or profiles to establish baseline data? All great coaches will gather data in some way to help you determine and reach your goals in a timely manner. Not-so-great coaches believe that it's OK to hook you into their coaching program forever. Your coach is working for you, and you should get transformational results from the resources that you have invested in the process.  
  1. A pleasant, inspirational demeanor. Great coaches inspire growth and change in their clients. Professional coaches are pleasant and upbeat “people people." They are self-assured and confident without being egotistical. A good coach delights in your successes and motivates you to move forward. By contrast, not-so-good coaches may produce guilt or anxiety in their clients. Not-so-good coaches may be highly critical and undermine your self-confidence. Not-so-good coaches keep you stuck in the same place so you keep “coming back for more.”  
  1. Provides encouragement. Working with a coach is like having your own personal cheerleader in your court. Wonderful coaches provide encouragement by providing a check-in system between coaching sessions. They may phone you, email or send a note of encouragement your way to keep your motivation high as you are practicing your new skills. Likewise, they will want you to reach out to them when you need a little pep talk or booster shot.
  1. Practices confidentiality and builds trust. When you work with an excellent coach, you will feel safe and at ease. A great coach will work hard at building a trusting relationship that will be the bedrock of your work together. A great coach will go to great lengths to create a confidential, professional and safe coaching environment. A less-than-professional coach will hold their coaching sessions in a public setting where others may overhear the conversation. Or, worse, they may share too much information about another client with you, which leaves you wondering if your information has been shared too.
  1. Ability to provide follow-up resources. Does your coach give you ideas, book titles and connections to other people who may help you reach your goals? Does your coach check in with you between coaching sessions? Excellent coaches have outstanding, up-to-date resources that they can easily access and provide to their clients. They have the office support systems in place to do so easily and in a timely manner. Great coaches are impeccable with their word, do what they say they will do, and deliver what you need to keep you moving in the right direction.

The perfect professional coach is out there waiting to help you reach your goals and soar beyond your wildest dreams. While it involves a bit of research and heavy lifting on the front end of the process to find an exceptional coaching fit, the results and rewards are well worth it. In the third and final article of this series, I will help you discern if you want to hire an independent coach or use one provided by your employer.  I will also suggest some questions to use when you interview coaches for the job of becoming YOUR perfect coach.  

© 2016 Rita Perea. All Rights Reserved.

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