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Moneyball at the Office: 4 Skills to Look for Within Your Staff

Max Farrell is the co-founder of Create Reason, an innovation experience firm that instills a culture of intrapreneurship inside established companies.

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A close friend of mine was let go from his job not too long ago due to the team choosing to “go in a different direction with the role." It was a huge blow to a number of people in the organization.

When he left, there was a gap on the team and a significant drop in morale. He was a high performer and a great motivator, yet the company chose to push forward without him.

This kind of story happens within companies every day, but what is omitted in this is the simple question asking: “What else could he do?"

It turns out this employee was versatile in a number of fields, but hired for marketing. The company made a crucial mistake when they let him go versus thinking through, “what else could we do with this great asset?”

A lot of us are sports fans, so it’s fitting to apply an analogy here. 

In our companies, we have the opportunity to play moneyball with the staff we have. It is the chance to rethink roles of those we have in house, regardless of what bucket they are currently placed in. 

Companies that allow for internal talent shifts and realignments are able to capitalize on a few things: 

-Lower turnover
-More engaged employees
-An adaptive workforce

Yet many firms choose to let good people go if a specific position is no longer needed. 

Instead of giving great talent the boot, companies should ask “what else can you do and what else do you want to do?” By opening the door to shifting talent around, especially in today’s consistently evolving work climate, we can learn about what else a person can bring to the table to help a company thrive. Oftentimes, what’s missing is the framework or the “stats” to identify if the player is worthy of having a key role on the team. 

Here are four skills that help us understand our strengths and weaknesses in the workplace: 

1. Shared skills: These are the skills we share on our resume, on LinkedIn and publicly present that we are experts in these fields. An example would be a marketing professional highlighting they are skilled in marketing.

2. Discovered skills: These are skills we learn on the job that we realize we have a knack for excelling with an unexpected talent. An example would be a marketing professional that finds out they actually thrive in a role creating new company products. 

3. Aspirational skills: These are skills that we aspire to be good at. Since we are always learning in all of our roles, we may highlight new skills we are actively developing for down the road. An example would be the marketing professional learning how to code to better create software. 

4. Delusional skills: These are the dangerous skills that people propose. This happens when someone shares they are “skilled” in one area, but history and results have continued to demonstrate otherwise. The reality check probably hasn’t hit yet. An example is a marketing professional that may think they are a great manager, but have an extremely disengaged team working with them. 

So how can we address this?

•Continue to challenge your team to address questions such as “what else do you want to do?”, “how do you want to grow?” and “how else could you add value to this team / organization”. Time and time again I see specialized skill sets pop up in companies. A recent find was an executive assistant that was truly a master event organizer. 

•Don’t shut the door on employees right away. It’s expensive to rehire and retrain employees. If the fix is simply shifting them to a different department or division, that could create waves of efficiency in an organization. 

•Give little experiments to evaluate these other possible skills. We don’t know until we try! So give interested staff a few small challenges to evaluate their ability to learn and execute in a new space.

Wrapping Up: 

At the end of the day, people are our most crucial asset, continuing to find ways to optimize that secret sauce in each organization will continue to be the difference maker. 

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Let's keep the conversation going: 

Max startupEmail: max@createreason.com

Twitter: @MaxOnTheTrack / @CreateReason

Web: CreateReason.com

FB: facebook.com/createreason

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