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Changing: seasons, business and content

- Alex Karei, marketing director, Webspec Design

Looking out my window, I can tell that the seasonal change is truly upon us. The colors are changing, leaves are falling and a fall chill has settled into the air. As the seasons change, we change as well. Sandals are exchanged for boots, bright decorations are exchanged for harvest themes and iced coffees are no longer as tempting as a cozy warm beverage (possibly, with some pumpkin).

Autumn leaves

In fact, we change as individuals with each season we encounter; and just like the seasons, our businesses are constantly in a state of change. Hopefully, the change comes in the form of growth or improvement, but regardless of what’s happening, a business is hardly stagnant.

That leads me to today’s point. As this change occurs, are you updating your website to reflect it?

At Webspec, this is an issue we run into a lot with clients. We build our clients their new, dream website – and they’re thrilled. But then, a month or so after launch, they get … busy. They’ve got a lot to do. The new website was fun, but they’ll update it later. Maybe next week. Well, maybe next month. That month turns to two months, turns to three – you get the picture. 

Just like you would never neglect pulling out your winter jacket, you shouldn’t neglect proper maintenance on your website. Depending on how many resources you have to work with, that can be a lot of work! However, there are some small things you can do to get yourself started on the right foot.

3 quick tips to maintain your company’s web presence:

  1. Go to your website at least once a week.
    This tip may be obvious to some, but it’s easy to overlook. Make sure that you visit your site each week and click around some, if not all, of your pages. Is everything looking like it should? Are page load times appropriate? This will take you less than five minutes, but is a good benchmark for noting anything out of the ordinary that you should report to your webmaster or add to your immediate to-do list.
  2. Make a schedule for reviewing content.
    Especially if you don’t have features (such as a blog) that you’re updating on a weekly basis, it’s a good idea to make a schedule for when you’ll review your website for any content updates. I would suggest making a monthly appointment on your calendar to do a thorough read-through, updating any content that may need to be changed. For example, updates on new staff members, current clients or upcoming events might have been missed when they happened, but your monthly review should catch these small mistakes.
  3. Give your website an “owner”.
    Some companies may feel it’s easiest to let multiple people update their website, and in a lot of cases, that’s probably true. However, if you put one person in charge of keeping track of what updates need to be done, you’re more likely to ensure things happen. The person in charge can plan to make updates themselves, or assign them out, but in general, they are responsible for keeping everyone on-track and your website looking as good as it should.

At the end of the day, remember that making small, ongoing updates will pay off when you don’t have to make a massive overhaul later. Plus, potential clients or customers will get the best, most accurate representation of your company or organization. Who doesn’t want that?

When's the last time you updated your website? 

Email: alex@webspecdesign.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/alextriesitout
Instagram: www.instagram.com/alextriesitout
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandriakarei
Blog: www.alextriesitout.com

 

Comments

Great tips, Alex! Thanks!

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