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Reaching higher

- Ying Sa is the founder and principal certified public accountant at Community CPA & Associates Inc. and a co-founder of the Immigrant Entrepreneurs Summit. 

When Juan urgently showed up at my office with his son in tow, I knew they came to discuss an important decision.

Juan sat down heavily into my office chair, sighed, and said, "I have to close my store. Junior does not want it."

Juan is 69 and has been running a local grocery store for the last 25 years. Business has always been good, and his only son, Junior, practically grew up in the store. Junior has always been the most reliable helper for Juan.

Now Junior is a handsome 18-year-old high school student with an academic record that can easily ship him to the East Coast. Junior helped with translation whenever Juan came to the office to see me. I noticed that Junior has always dressed professionally to come to my office. He carries himself and speaks like a professional. Recently Junior had called me a couple of times about his college applications.

Today Junior wore a white and blue Tommy Hilfiger T-shirt and a pair of black frame Miu Miu glasses. Behind those glasses, I saw worry in his eyes.

Junior said, “Sorry Ying, we have to come to talk to you because I think you know what is going on. You know, I do not want to be like my Dad, and I want to go to school. I really appreciate what my mom and dad gave me, but I do not want to just work in the store. I have better and bigger things to do and to learn."

“OK,” I said. Looking at Juan, I saw that he was looking away. I understood why, but in my heart I was happy for Junior. There was a moment of silence between us.

“Well, that is really OK!” I finally broke the awkward silence. “Juan, we will look for a buyer, and I am sure Junior will help while we transfer the ownership.”

Junior nodded sincerely and turned to his dad. “Dad, I will help you to sell it. Do not keep the store for me, because I have my own plans. You can call it dream, my own dream,” Junior continued.

“I will do well in college, and I will try to support myself. Please let me go to college, and I will not trouble you and Mom financially. Just let me do my own thing.”

I looked at Juan and saw tears in his eyes. He seemed older than he was a moment ago. “It is not easy to build a retail business like this. So hard to let it go,” Juan whispered as if he was talking to himself, and his chin muscle tightened as he held back tears.

Junior put one of his hands on his Dad’s and added: “Dad, isn’t this what you want? You want me to be successful, and you and Mom want me to have all the opportunities that the American kids have. I have them, and you gave that to me. I am an American; I want to do better and greater things, Dad.

"Your store is great, but that is for you and Mom. I appreciate what you two have done, but I want something different and I dream differently than you two.” Junior gently rocked his dad’s arm and continued, "Dad, I cannot help you with your store. Sell it if you cannot run it without me. I promise to make you and Mom proud.”

It was hard to convince Juan to let the business go, but he eventually agreed and he finally said, “Junior, I am too old to handle this store without you. We will sell it. Mom and Dad will save the money for your college."

Finally we called a business broker, and now the store is officially for sale. They left, but I was given a bittersweet reminder of a situation that many immigrant families I know face.

For the first generation of immigrants, like Juan, choosing what they love to do might not be possible. But what they can do is make the dream more attainable for the next generation, so they can reach higher in the sky. Juan and Junior are not so different from several other immigrant families.

By standing on Juan’s shoulders, Junior can move farther toward his dream.

 

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