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Embracing the challenges of a website

- Alex Karei, marketing director for Webspec Design, blogs about web strategy.

“Maintaining your website” can be such an ugly phrase. It really seems to have a negative connotation to most people I talk to. Website maintenance is the chore that they have to do after they get done with their brand-new, shiny website, and the maintenance part isn't nearly as fun. 

People ask me a lot what my job title means, and what I do on a daily basis. To me, updating our website might actually be one of the most enjoyable things that are part of my job description. I don’t see it as a pain or a nuisance, but rather a fun challenge. You might say I’m biased, working for a web firm, but I’ve enjoyed working on websites since I was young(er).

I don’t know that I ever realized how much I like working on websites until I observed how much others may not enjoy them. I’ve never found working on a website to be a pain or an annoyance, but rather a challenge to be taken on. A website is something that I can improve every day in order to stay ahead of our competitors. There’s always something new to learn, and some new idea to be discovered.

Why I love working on websites

I have a legitimate reason to love working on websites — and it may not be what you'd expect. The thing I've observed with most people's website complaints is that there’s almost always a silver lining of benefits underneath their supposed website chores. Next time you throw your website a snarky look, just remember …

“It’s so much work!”

This thing that is so much work is one of the most robust marketing tools you have the potential to get your hands on. You can have so much powerful information packed into one website, and that information can be targeted to different users. Think about how big a brochure would be if it had to include the same information your website does. Someone could be reading for hours!

“The website’s never done!”

Something I wish others would understand is that just because a website isn’t done doesn’t mean that it’s not acceptable to be on the internet. Sometimes having a “phase 1” and a “phase 2” means that you’re able to push your marketing out the door quicker, or with more robust features later. Not done is not the same as "bad," or "incorrect." The website just hasn't quite reached its full potential. But with a little extra work post-launch, don’t worry. You can get there!

Websiteneverdone

“It’s hard to figure out how to update those images!”

I get it. Not truly knowing how to properly update your website can be a harder issue to deal with. However, I will still go back to a word I used earlier: challenge. Yes, it’s hard to figure out how to tackle a website issue when your main webmaster is on vacation and the handbook is, well, nowhere. But I would encourage you to not think of these issues as a nuisance, but rather as a challenge that you will overcome. Just try it! Even if the change is just a new head shot for your CEO, it can feel amazing to have conquered that assignment and have solved that problem. After all, the more challenges you take on, the better you’ll get at solving them (it’s inevitable).

How do you feel about updating your website?

 

Alex-Karei_YPFinalist2016Alex is the marketing & communications director for Webspec Design, a website design and development and digital marketing agency in Urbandale. Connect with her via:

Email: alex@webspecdesign.com

Twitter: www.twitter.com/alex_karei

Instagram: www.instagram.com/alex_karei

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/alexandriakarei

Comments

Thanks Alex! I'm currently getting web development under my belt, your articles are always very helpful.

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