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Should public schools care about customer service?

Red-school-blur-door

Tom Vander Well, executive vice president of c wenger group, is a recognized customer service authority in the contact center industry.

It's back-to-school season, and just the other day I met with administrators of my local school district. We've been having discussions over the summer with regard to the administrative assistants who answer phones in the schools' offices and greet visitors.

The superintendent told me that, for some time, he has wanted to find a way to equip these admins with customer service skills and to find a way to deliver a consistent, positive experience for their constituents across the district.

"These individuals are often the first impression of our school district for a parent or community member," he told me. "We want that impression to be a positive one."

As the conversation continued the other administrator added some color commentary.

"When you visit schools in other districts they will often tell you what schools they don't want you to visit," he explained. "It's often about the secretary or administrative assistant who runs the school office. They know that your experience with that person is going to make your visit a less than positive experience."

I'm excited to get to work on a small project with the district's key impression makers.

I walked away from this fascinating conversation with a few key take-aways about customer service:

  • Customer service is not just an issue for retail business. I'm so impressed with school administrators who are thinking strategically about the service experience of their constituents. So often we confine our thinking about customer service to classic retail and service industries. My experience over the years is that investment in service experience has the greatest impact in markets and sectors not traditionally known for caring about good customer service.
  • First impressions matter. I believe it was Dale Carnegie who made popular the phrase, "You never get a second chance to make a first impression." For a new parent moving into a school district, that administrative assistant can make or break the parent's impression of the school district. Training and coaching on a few key service skills can make a huge difference in overall satisfaction with the school and the district.
  • Mission and value statements are useless without expectations and accountability. In my conversation with the district administrators I was informed that two of the three "pillars" that the district had defined were "pursuing excellence" and "building caring relationships." The administrator recognized that our project to define and implement a consistent service experience across the schools was simply acting on the values the district had already set as goals for themselves.

Are you in an industry or profession that isn't known for making customer service a high priority? Is so, you might find that it is the very thing that could set you apart from your competitors and build stronger levels of loyalty and retention from your customers or clients.

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